Debris and detritus

cyborg, programmer, gamer, social justice warrior, cyclist, miscreant

Posts tagged perspective

Sep 6

koriblr:

xen0phile:

koriblr:

xen0phile:

pokepuffs:

these frames were consecutive 

"Jesus Camp"

Thing is, yes, the american lifestyle can be a bit loud, a bit tacky, and you don’t want to be poor in America, but then again you don’t want to be poor anywhere. You don’t want to get sick. You’d better not loose that job. There are a lot of things that could be better. But for a lot of mostly-white, middle-class people, the american lifestyle is pretty nice. Comfortable. You’re well-fed, you’ve got your TV and your car, soccer practice for the kids and you’re sure of going to heaven because praise Jesus. What I’m saying is, from the lady’s point of view, it makes perfect sense to love America, and love the lifestyle, and that view out the car window really is a picture of the greatest place on Earth.

But, koriblr, the *aesthetics* of this sort of environment are… soul-killing (for lack of a better term). It’s. Fucking. Ugly. Believe me, I live in this sort of place! Fuckton of wealth, and we build this horrid-looking monstrosity that makes me want to kill myself.

It’s like cars… it’s not just that they contribute to global warming, it’s that the whole car-based environment *looks* wretched. I would object to suburban sprawl even if cars were powered by love and rainbows.

However. I admit aesthetics are very subjective: I just think that my sense of aesthetics is very orthogonal to the archetypal American. Which makes me feel even more alienated. Makes me not feel at home in my home country. Makes me consider moving, but I have no idea whether I’d find any place that would suite me better.

Well, xen0phile, I don’t know if there’s any way to respond on Tumblr except to reblog, so here I am.

Yes, the aesthetic, and I dislike it too. One of the things I didn’t really like about the US, when I lived there, was the whole layout of the cities: hardly anything close enough to walk to, huge amounts of space devoted to cars and their service arrangements (parking, gas stations, parking, car washes, parking, driveways, parking, super-wide streets, and parking). And perhaps the second thing was the ugly, bland, cheap aesthetic of the strip mall. Even the cars in that still turn me off with their bulbous, shapeless profiles. No-Cal is better than some other places for not being like that quite so much, but it is still like that a lot.

But I don’t love America, or the american lifestyle. I can, however, see how someone could. They’d have to have different priorities from me, but that’s not so unusual.

I feel sad for the woman. I don’t think she would understand why, I think she might be offended by it, but I can’t help myself. I also think it’s a rare privilege I have, because of my relative wealth, and my own comfortable lifestyle, that allows me to feel sad for her, and, if I’m honest with myself, to judge her. It was noticing how I was judging her that triggered my first response. By all means let’s reject that lifestyle. It is butt ugly, on top of the other things wrong with it. I’m with you all the way on that. I don’t even think it is typical of most Americans to like it. There is a strong component of momentum to it. It is the way it is, and it takes a lot of effort to fight that. I just thought it’s also important to understand how people can say things like that, without irony, that they love the American lifestyle as they drive by the strip mall with its Burger King and Chinese & American food, billboards advertising cellphones and mattresses and legal services. I want to make sure I don’t dismiss people as crazy and lose sight of the fact that they are people. They are people first, and then they are crazy.


Jul 6
mydrunkkitchen:

Little sister keeping me in check. #sistercon2014

mydrunkkitchen:

Little sister keeping me in check. #sistercon2014


May 23
explore-blog:

To give you pause: If we treated physical illness like we do mental illness. Complement with a fascinating read on mood science and the evolutionary origins of depression and artist Bobby Baker’s courageous visual diary of mental illness. 

explore-blog:

To give you pause: If we treated physical illness like we do mental illness. Complement with a fascinating read on mood science and the evolutionary origins of depression and artist Bobby Baker’s courageous visual diary of mental illness

(via deerylou2)


May 3
mikerugnetta:

After going to XOXO last year I had a semi-serious idea to organize bi-monthly hang outs at a bar in Brooklyn because many people at the conference seemed to share in roughly the same anxiety: “How is it that I–a person who has no idea what they’re doing and is not qualified to do it–have gotten myself into this position?” 
At XOXO there was lots of talk about the Impostor Syndrome. Inside my brain there is lots of thinking about how I am an impostor. Margaret Atwood maybe also thinks (or at one point thought) she’s an impostor. And so I thought well whatever maybe we should all hang out and drink and be impostors together? 

mikerugnetta:

After going to XOXO last year I had a semi-serious idea to organize bi-monthly hang outs at a bar in Brooklyn because many people at the conference seemed to share in roughly the same anxiety: “How is it that I–a person who has no idea what they’re doing and is not qualified to do it–have gotten myself into this position?” 

At XOXO there was lots of talk about the Impostor Syndrome. Inside my brain there is lots of thinking about how I am an impostor. Margaret Atwood maybe also thinks (or at one point thought) she’s an impostor. And so I thought well whatever maybe we should all hang out and drink and be impostors together? 


Mar 26

jtotheizzoe:

You know it’s spring when, just after sunset, the refrigerator constellation rises in the western sky.

(But seriously, remember that our perspective on the stars is at the same time wonderfully unique but not at all special, and the stellar stories that we write are products not only of our imaginations, but also our brain’s relentless desire to recognize patterns in random assortments of far away dots)

(via pbsdigitalstudios)


Mar 18
“I think there’s something to be said for learning about trauma without experiencing it all over again. The only way I figured out how to do that was with therapy. When I see people who require trigger warnings, my first thought is to pay attention to what they’re saying, but my second thought is “Are they getting the help they need?” I think we’re missing a bigger point here, because trigger warnings are really about mental health. The world is shitty and unyielding and not likely to bend to your will, and your best offense is a good defense. With the right tools, it’s possible to live in a sea of assholes and thrive.”

An amazing post about the problem with trigger warnings, from my esteemed pal Danielle.  (via emilyvgordon)

"The path to healing is not avoidance" - QFT


Dec 8

Jul 18

mikerugnetta:

liamdryden:

lo-db:

socialistexan:

isaaccorbanwelch:

hey look bmo

A discussion of pop culture, third wave feminism, and gender that isn’t terrible or cissexist, hooray PBSIdea channel!

this is really, really good. he switches bmo’s pronouns throughout the video and also gives a good and respectful explanation of gender

PBSIdeaChannel is really great you guys

y’all’re too kind, ferreal. :D


Jun 26

Feb 21

Feb 6
“Male privilege is “I have a boyfriend” being the only thing that can actually stop someone from hitting on you because they respect another male-bodied person more than they respect your rejection/lack of interest.” The Sociological Cinema (via trimichaelceratops)

(via upworthy)


Jan 13
claytoncubitt:

Wherever you are you’re at the center of your universe.

claytoncubitt:

Wherever you are you’re at the center of your universe.


Jan 6

(via deerylou2)


Dec 6

pbsarts:

Are Cell Phones Replacing Reality? - Idea Channel

Can you live without your phone? 

We’ve all become pretty attached to our cellular devices: it’s a GPS, a camera, a game console, a social media portal… and half a million other things, all in our pocket! From concerts to meals to our pets, we process and experience the world through our phone. But as we see in so many mobile phone ads, the representations of these moments (whether its instagrams, foursquare check ins or Facebook shares) seem to be taking over and replacing the experience itself. In this brave new world is the mobile phone a tool, or a filter through which we experience a new reality?

Let us know what sorts of crazy ideas you have, about this episode and otherwise:
Tweet at us! @pbsideachannel (yes, the longest twitter username ever)
Email us! pbsideachannel [at] gmail [dot] com

Hosted by Mike Rugnetta (@mikerugnetta)
Made by Kornhaber Brown (http://www.kornhaberbrown.com)


Nov 29

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